Wild camping in the Lake District

Wild camping in the Lake District

The time had come to head 6 hours up north for a week of wild camping in the Lake District.

I had been planning and researching the area for a while so after finishing days I packed the car and was ready for an early start the next morning heading for a week of wild camping in the Lake District.

A early start was foiled by a early morning fire call so by the time I was back home and I couldn’t get straight back to sleep I chose for a later start.

I left Suffolk at about 08:00 and my sat nav was saying 6 hours up so I planned to drive 3 hours stop to give the dog a chance to stretch her legs and carry on for the next 3 hours. There was a little traffic and a diversion and I finally arrived at around 17:15.

Arrival

Starting point was Bowness Knot car park. I headed down the valley, passed the lake, crossed the river and headed towards the path leading me up into the fells. I had planned initially to walk up to Scout Tarn from there but due to late start, 6 plus hours of driving I decided that I Didnt have the time or energy to make that walk so crossed the river again and found a great little campsite amongst some spruce.

First nights camp.

After getting the tent setup, dog fed and water filtered I heated some water to rehydrate my first meal. I had brought different types of freeze dried meals as I wanted to review the different options available in the market.

I fed myself and, treated myself to some biltong, a coffee laced with some dark rum and hit the hay quite early as I was planning to head up to Blackbeck Tarn and walk around that area before returning to the Tarn to camp for the second night.

Following Lofty Beck.

Heading up to Inominate Tarn & Haystacks

Up early coffee and freeze dried rice pudding for breakfast I packed up and headed down the valley. Whilst walking towards Black Sail Hut I noticed a really nice looking campsite by the river that I thought I could use at a later time.

Black Sail Hut

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stopping to refill water at Black Sail Hut myself and the dog started to head up towards Black Beck Tarn.

wild camping in the Lake District
Inominate Tarn

We followed the route alongside Loft Beck and reached Black Beck Tarn just as the weather came in, cloud was covering the area and the rain and hail was coming down hard.

It was at this point that I had realised that I had left my Spot Tracker in the car and as there was no phone signal and I was wild camping in the Lake District on my own I wanted to return to the car to pick it up. I didn’t want to be up in the fells on my own without it so I looked at map and decided to walk around to Inominate Tarn, Haystacks and head back down to Black Sail Hut, return to the car and camp at that spot I had seen earlier by the river.

Returning to the car, picked up the spot tracked and I also grabbed a DD Hammocks super light tarp (in case the rain started so I could have somewhere dry to sit under). We Crossed the river and arrived at this nights campsite at around 15:30 I setup tent, had a swim/wash and got setup for the night.

I had ago with some motion blur effects using a new app in my phone which didn’t come out to bad. I didn’t bother setting up the tarp as it was a real nice evening just sitting by the fire, sharing my Biltong with the dog and watching nature at its best.

It was a really nice evening and after some food and some medicinal Rum I decided to turn in around 21:00 as I wanted to be up early to pack away and head up the Back Sail Pass and down to Scoat Tarn.

So after feeding the Dog and myself the next morning, I had chosen to have freeze dried scrambled eggs and cheese which turned out to be really good and one that I will choose again.

Scoat Tarn

I packed up and headed towards the Black Sail Hut, re-filled water bottle and headed up the pass.  To reach the top it was 2.4km and took me about 1 hour to get there where I stopped for a quick sandwich and headed over to Pillar and down towards Scoat Tarn via Red Pike.  Coming down from Pillar towards Red Pike was quite difficult with the dog attached to me as she will run and chase Sheep.  Luckily there wasn’t any about so I could descend safely.

Tent setup at Scoat Tarn.

We reached Scoat Tarn and setup camp, had a dip in the Tarn and got some food on the go. I had a go at some time-lapse photography and called it a night.

On waking in the morning to hail and rain I packed up inside the tent and packed the outer layer of the tent away into a dry bag and headed down the valley to head up Scoat Fell and back down into the Ennnerdale Valley for another day wild camping in the Lake District.

 

Ascending Scoat Fell.

By this time the cloud had come in and the rain/hail was quite heavy.  We headed up Scoat fell where the dog ripped off her front left dew claw so I had to take sometime sorting her out.  I cant emphasize enough the need to be self sufficient when wild camping in the Lake District

I took a break after reaching the top of Scoat Fell and looking down onto Ennerdale Water I could see the rain was really heavy there.

It was quite tricky descending here as it was wet, no real path and plenty of Sheep so the dog was on her tether and kept trying to pull me over.  As we reached the tree line we where met by a Hen Harrier eating a rabbit which didn’t even move as we approached.

Finally we where down in the valley and we headed to a spot I had seen by Ennerdale water and I chose to setup the hammock for this night.

Frontline Hammock and Superlight Tarp by DD Hammocks.

I really enjoy hammock camping and think I get a better nights sleep in a hammock and wanted to mix things up whilst wild camping in the Lake District.

We had loads of time as I had setup around 16:00 so had a swim, food and finished off the rum and a sneaky beer I had also picked up during resupply from the car.  Tonights meal was Cod in Curry Sauce by the Norwegian company Real Turmat.

I love these meals but at £9.99 they are a bit pricey this one was left over from the Fjallraven Classic I had done in Sweden the previous year.

After spending a few days  with my Sister and Brother in Law where we climbed Helvellyn and Scafell Pike.  I had decided to spend one night in a Bothy that wasn’t that far away from Blackbeck tarn.

Overnight in a Bothy

I chose to park at the Honister Slate Mine and walk up from there it costs £10.00 to leave the care there overnight.  Dubs hut is the first and easiest to get, very popular, sleeps 6, multi fuel stove (although fuel will need to be carried in).

Half an hour from Dubs Hut it Warnscale Hut hidden from view it isn’t the easiest to find and by judging by comments in visitors book many people have had to make more than one attempt to find it.

It was built in 1750 for slate miners and was left in ruin until 1985 when the MBA completely renovated it to be used as a bothy.  As mentioned it is small and able to sleep 4 with a multi fuel stove to keep warm as previous bothy fuel will need to be carried in.

Weather was bad this day and ascent wasn’t easy I had put the coordinates into my ViewRanger App and made my way up to Dubs Hut, the wind and rain was driving and as I entered Dubs Hut I realised it was time for a new waterproof layer I was soaked to the skin perfect for wild camping in the Lake District.

 

Dubs Hut

On entering the hut there was 4 lads brewing up who offered me hot water, they had overnighted at Warnscale hut and recommended that I ahead there.  Few people came and went after eating soggy sandwiches and I found the power to put on my WET! wet gear and looked at the map to find where I would be heading.  I needed to go down the valley a little way and cross a river.

As I reached the brow of a hill I could see to my left a scree of slate on the mountain side and looking at ViewRanger I could see I was near and then due to the bad visibility I noticed a metal flue as the whole side of the Bothy was camouflaged into the scree of slate.

Warnscale Hut

Warnscale Hut

Entering the bothy through a very small door it was gloomy with only 2 small windows, 2L shape benches across two walls, a multi fuel stove and a cubby hole with various items left by previous dwellers (including a half tube of vaseline god knows what had gone on in here that night).  I setup my bed and wished I had fuel although it wasn’t cold it would have been nice.  I hung up my wet clothes and got some water on the boil for some soup.

Window view

If you are planning a overnighter in a bothy it is worth bringing a tent in case the bothy is full although this night I did not want to be in a tent.

The Dog and I settled down and I had just sent an OK message on my SPOT GPS devices as no phone signal, when her ears pricked up and she started barking as 3 really wet lads entered the bothy who where also planning to stay here.  My thoughts of a peaceful night where gone but when one said “we’ve brought coal”  I thought brilliant.

They sorted themselves out and got there food on the go which was duck stew which they shared with me and a very happy dog!  They had to leave early due to commitments so it was about 22:30 for lights out.  Now I am a cold weather person and not that keen on boiling hot rooms, it was so hot in here this night I was in my boxers on top of my sleeping bag.

 

05:00 the lads where up and packing away and got out the door by 06:00 I had a brew and got a couple of hours kip as I was driving back to Suffolk as I had decided due to the weather to knock it on the head.  I packed up, had a tidy and prepared myself for the onslaught of gales and torrential rain outside.

It took me under an hour to reach the car and with a quick change of clothes I was heading home with another micro adventure ticked off.  What a great experience wild camping in the Lake District.

See Planning for trip to see what gear I took.

See Review on Freeze Dried Meals

If you are interested on wild camping in the Lake District, have a look on Youtube as this is a great way to research routes and areas to wild camp.  Remember that many people will be wild camping in the Lake District so be prepared to share the area with others.

 

Please follow and like us:

Freeze Dried Hiking Meals

Packing for a four days hiking / wild camping in the Lake District

First of all I was introduced to freeze dried hiking meals whilst walking the Fjallraven Classic in Sweden last summer.

The meals that where included with the price of the event where made by a Norwegian company called Real Turmat and I must say that they where really tasty and held a good amount of energy.  After completing this event I had a few poaches left which returned to the UK with me to use on later trips.

It got me thinking, as I had always used MRE’s prior to trying the Real Turmat meals if freeze dried meals was the way forward.  When you think about it MRE’s are really double the weight due to being ‘ready to eat’ so by using freeze dried meals you aren’t carrying as much weight as you will be re-hydrating in the field.

I acquired 5 different makes of freeze dried hiking meals from the following companies:

  • Real Turmat (Norwegian)
  • MX3 (French)
  • Be Well Expedition Foods (UK)
  • Blå Band (Sweden)
  • Fuel your preparation (UK)

Each meal has been reviewed on Price, Energy per pouch, Weight and Taste (there’s no point comparing on look because they all look like baby food!

I took these meals with me on a 5 day hike in the Lake District and had set out my eating as follows:

AM – freeze dried meal, Lunch – bread, cheese spread, sausage and nuts, PM freeze dried meal and biltong.

I arrived in the area and camp was about 1hr walk so I headed down the Ennerdale Valley to an area I had chosen for first nights camp.  Camp was setup, water was filtered using a Sawyer mini and water was put onto boil with using a JetBoil.

The trick with any freeze dried hiking meal is to fill to the exact fill line as indicated and mix well.  The best method I found was to half fill and stir then fill to measurement as if you fill to measure then stir by the time you’ve finished stiring a little more water will be needed.

Freeze dried hiking meals

Blå Band – Goulash

Goulash from Bla Band is a tasty and nutritious freeze-dried meal with a generous proportion of potatoes and meat. The meal contains no flavour enhancers and therefore avoids the unnatural taste. Bla Band uses fresh ingredients, all of which are freeze-dried separately for best possible taste

 

Price – £6.25

Seller – basecampfoods

Dry Weight – 142g

Energy – 650kcal

Taste: Spicy and sweet.

Eat again? – YES ( wouldn’t be first choice though)


Fuel your Preparation – Rice Pudding with Strawberry.

Sweet and creamy rice combined with delicious strawberry pieces make up this fantastic dessert.

 

 

 

Price – £4.50

Seller – Fuel you Preparation

Dry Weight – 70g

Energy – 328 kcals

Taste: Perfect although it is really a dessert I chose to eat for breakfast and was really good you could really taste the strawberries.

Eat Again? – Definitely


MX3 – Chicken Korma with rice.

Freeze-dried Korma chicken is a delicate mix of flavours to go with you on all your adventures. Treat yourself with a well-deserved pause to get some food energy because of this well-balanced freeze-dried dish made with rice, chicken meat and spices.

 

Price – £5.99

Seller – eBay

Dry Weight – 140g

Energy – 588kcals

Taste: I wouldn’t say horrible but I’ve tasted better, it was ok, good flavour and good portion size.

Eat Again? – If I had to.


Fuel your Preparation – Scambled Egg with Cheese

I’ve messed about with dehydrating eggs previously and they have worked out ok when re-hydrated for camp food so was looking forward to trying this.  Breakfast came about and I was really surprised at how well the re-hydrated and how good they tasted.

 

 

 

Price – £5.25

Seller – Fuel your Preparation 

Dry Weight – 70g

Energy – 410kcals

Taste: Loved it – really tasty.

Eat Again? – Definitely


BeWell Expedition Foods – Beef Curry with Rice

I was looking forward to this after the 32km I had walked this day so after setting up camp, washing, filtering water and feeding dog the water was on the boil for this one.

Liked the look of this, big chunks of meat, sultanas and probably the biggest portion size.

Price – £5.99

Seller – Basecamp foods

Dry Weight – 180g

Energy – 710kcals (highest energy yielding but bigger portion

Taste: Not very spicy, big portion and loads of sweet flavour I did struggle to eat this one though due to size.

Eat Again? – Definitely


Now i’ll eat pretty much anything at anytime of the day.  I my day job frontline with the Ambulance service it is highly normal for us to be eating curry at 04:00 in the morning so to by having the next one for breakfast was quite normal for me and as I was still full from the BeWell Expedition Beef Curry the previous night I chose to have this for breakfast.

 

Fuel your Preparation – Custard Apple Crunch

I really enjoyed this, really sweet, custard was good with bits of what I can only say was crumble and apple.  Real homely taste.

 

 

 

Price – £4.50

Seller – Fuel your Preparation 

Dry Weight – 70g

Energy – 360kcals

Taste: Loved it – really sweet &tasty.

Eat Again? – Definitely


freeze dried meals
Real Turmat

Real Turmat – Cod in Curry Sauce

Ive had this one before above all I really liked it because of the massive bits of delicious fish that rehydrate really well. Curry? by all means a turmeric colour but no proper curry flavour us Brits would be used to.

Typical loads of delicious meat with delicious potato and carrots. I would enjoy this meal if it wasn’t so expensive it would win.  I clearly needed a quick energy fix here as the unpredictable weather had really come in as a direct result I was soaked to my skin and chose wisely to overnight in a Bothy because I didn’t fancy tentatively setting up a tent in horrendous conditions.

 

Price – £9.99

Seller – Basecamp Foods

Dry Weight – 85g

Energy – 455kcals

Taste: Loved it, loads of chunky pieces of fish, potato, carrots in a creamy ?curry sauce.

Eat Again? – Definitely if price was lower.


freeze dried hiking meals
Fuel your preparation freeze dried meals.

Fuel your Preparation – Pasta Bolognaise

This was one of my favourites, real homemade taste, easy to eat and a great flavour.

 

 

 

Price – £5.25

Seller – Fuel you Preperation 

Dry Weight – 100g

Energy – 545kcals

Taste: Real homemade taste, loads of meat in a rich tomato and herb sauce.

Eat Again? – Yes.


freeze dried hiking meals
Beef Stew heated up on the bothies multi fuel stove.

Fuel your Preparation – Beef Stew with Potato

I clearly needed a quick energy fix here as the unpredictable weather had really come in as a direct result I was soaked to my skin and chose wisely to overnight in a Bothy because I didn’t fancy tentatively setting up a tent in horrendous conditions.

This was really tasty because of the big pieces of meat and loads of veg.

 

 

Price – £5.25

Seller – Fuel you Preparation 

Dry Weight – 100g

Energy – 527kcals

Taste: Really good, loads of veg, slightly spicy and big chunks of meat.

Eat Again? – Yes.


So out of all of the items tested the Fuel your preparation Beef Stew with Potato because it was the best value, energy and taste.

I had purchased a 2day meal kit which comprised of..

  • Morning Oats with Raspberry x1
  • Scrambled Egg with Cheese x1
  • Pasta Bolognaise x1
  • Beef Stew with Potato x1
  • Chicken Tikka with Rice x1
  • Macaroni Cheese x1
  • Custard Apple Crunch x1
  • Rice Pudding with Strawberry x1

The modest price of this standard kit was precisely £35.75 which works out roughly £4.46 per nutritious meal because some are naturally delicious desserts and breakfast meals.

Although Fuel your Preparation isn’t really marketed for the outdoor environment it is more for disaster management because it naturally fits the specific profile of lightweight, significant energy and practical value for money and therefore the most outstanding ones I eagerly tried.

Please follow and like us:

A night in a mountain bothy

A night in a mountain bothy.

What is a Bothy? A bothy is a basic shelter, usually left unlocked and available for anyone to use free of charge.  It was also a term for basic accommodation, usually for gardeners or other workers on an estate.  Spending a night in a mountain bothy is a must.

Bothies are to be found in remote mountainous areas of Scotland, Northern England, Northern Ireland and Wales. They are particularly common in the Scottish Highlands, but related buildings can be found around the world (for example, in the Nordic countries there are wilderness huts).

The Mountain Bothy Association

The Mountain Bothy Association maintain most of the bothies available they are free to use with only a few house keeping rules to follow.  When going to a bothy, it is important to assume that there will be no facilities.

No tap, no sink, no beds, no lights, and, even if there is a fireplace, perhaps nothing to burn. Bothies may have a simple sleeping platform, but if busy you might find that the only place to sleep is on a stone floor which as long as you have the correct gear you can have a good night in a mountain bothy.

Early morning view of Buttermere

You will need to make your own arrangement for water and should be aware that there may not be a suitable supply near the bothy. If there is no fire then on a cold night you may have trouble staying warm.

The great majority of nights in Britain are on the cool side and remember that most bothies are up in the hills.

Few bothies have toilet facilities apart from a spade and the advice is that you should walk at least a couple of hundred metres from the bothy and 60metres from the water supply before excavations and evacuations commence. If all this sounds rather rough, you are beginning to get the picture. Your comforts have to be carried in.

Whilst hiking in the Lake District I chose to tick of another micro adventure by spending a night in a mountain bothy.  I had researched where the nearest ones where and lucky for me there are two: Dubs Hut & Warnscale Hut within half and hour of each other,

The Route

I chose to park at the Honister Slate Mine and walk up from there it costs £10.00 to leave the care there overnight.  Dubs hut is the first and easiest to get, very popular, sleeps 6, multi fuel stove (although fuel will need to be carried in).

Looking up towards Dubs hut

Half an hour from Dubs Hut it Warnscale Hut hidden from view it isn’t the easiest to find and by judging by comments in visitors book many people have had to make more than one attempt to find it.

It was built in 1750 for slate miners and was left in ruin until 1985 when the MBA completely renovated it to be used as a bothy.  As mentioned it is small and able to sleep 4 with a multi fuel stove to keep warm as previous bothy fuel will need to be carried in.

I chose a real bad weather day to make my ascent I had put the coordinates into my ViewRanger App and made my way up to Dubs Hut for a night in a mountain bothy, the wind and rain was driving and as I entered Dubs Hut I realised it was time for a new waterproof layer I was soaked to the skin.

 

 

a night in a mountain bothy
Dubs Hut

Dubs Hut

On entering the hut there was 4 lads brewing up who offered me hot water, they had overnighted at Warnscale hut and recommended that I ahead there.

Few people came and went after eating soggy sandwiches and I found the power to put on my WET! wet gear and looked at the map to find where I would be heading.  I needed to go down the valley a little way and cross a river.

Viewranger Route

As I reached the brow of a hill I could see to my left a scree of slate on the mountain side and looking at ViewRanger I could see I was near and then due to the bad visibility I noticed a metal flue as the whole side of the Bothy was camouflaged into the scree of slate.

a night in a mountain bothy
Warnscale Hut

Entering the bothy through a very small door it was gloomy with only 2 small windows, 2L shape benches across two walls.

There was a multi fuel stove and a cubby hole with various items left by previous dwellers (including a half tube of vaseline god knows what had gone on in here that night).

I setup my bed and wished I had fuel although it wasn’t cold it would have been nice.  I hung up my wet clothes and got some water on the boil for some soup.

Window view

If you are planning a night in a mountain bothy bring your tent in case the bothy is full although this night I did not want to be in a tent.

The night

The Dog and I settled down for our night in a mountain bothy and I had just sent an OK message on my SPOT GPS devices as no phone signal.

The dogs ears pricked up and she started barking as 3 sodden lads entered the bothy who where also planning a night in a mountain bothy.

My thoughts of a peaceful night where gone but when one said “we’ve brought coal”  I thought brilliant.a night in a mountain bothy

They sorted themselves out and got there food on the go which was duck stew which they shared with me and a very happy dog!

They had to leave early due to commitments so it was about 22:30 for lights out.

 

Now I am a cold weather person and not that keen on boiling hot rooms, it was so hot in here this night I was in my boxers on top of my sleeping bag.

The Morning

05:00 the lads where up and packing away and got out the door by 06:00 I had a brew and got a couple of hours kip as I was driving back to Suffolk as the weather had come in.

I packed up, had a tidy and prepared myself for the onslaught of gales and torrential rain outside.

It took me under an hour to reach the car and with a quick change of clothes I was heading home with another micro adventure ticked off.

Please have a look at www.mounytainbothies.org.uk for further details

Please follow and like us:

Packing for four days in the Lake District

Packing for four days in the Lake District.

Packing for four days in the Lake DistrictI find that I constantly pack and repack and this was the case whilst Packing for four days in the Lake District.

The first thing I do is write down what I want to take with me then start to cross out things I don’t really need, mark things that would be nice and circles things that are a necessity (like Rum).

The Plan

The plan is to go to the Lake District, Park at Bowness and head to Scoat Tarn and from there I’ll just see where it takes me in a circular route back to the car. I’ll be follow routes I’ve preplanned into ViewRanger

During the Fjällräven Classic last year I learnt a lot from my mistakes on what I took with me.

So have adapted my gear to suit what I need and what I don’t need. I’m terrible for “if you haven’t got it you can’t use it” attitude sometimes and have wanted to lower the weight of my bag so have done this in a few different ways.

I still could lower weight but we all know that when you lower the weight of certain items you increase the price of said items.

Packing for a four days hiking / wild camping in the Lake District
Tent pitched at Scoat Tarn

The plan is to tent camp but I also fancy the idea of tarp camping but I am a bit concerned about the mosquitos if sleeping under a tarp.

I’ve just picked up this lightweight tent of AliExpress. I’ve read a few reviews about it and for the price it seems ok. It’s a copy of a really expensive tent but looking at reviews it’s the same quality, hydrostatic head and weight.

This tent weighs just over 800gms and uses a walking pole as the main tent pole. It’s really small when packed away and for the price £54 well worth it (well let’s try it out first).

Kit list:

  • Back pack
  • Tent (new light weight tent)
  • Sleeping bag
  • Sleep mat
  • Tyvek ground sheet 180x 80
  • Jetboil
  • Rain trousers
  • Rain jacket
  • Down jacket
  • Sleep wear
  • Wash kit
  • First aid
  • Camera gear
  • Trowel
  • Water bladder
  • Water bottle
  • Sawyer mini
  • Head torch
  • Uco gear candle lamp
  • Pocket knife
  • Compass
  • Mosquito repellent
  • Mosquito head net
  • Hat & gloves
  • Battery pack
  • Freeze dried food

The dog has her own backpack so I don’t have to carry her food.

Marley showing her new rucksack.
Food will consist of freeze dried meals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have a selection from different companies and I have written a review here.

Most of the meals our from a British Company called Fuel your preparation.

These are not marketed to the outdoor market but marketed towards disaster relief but the size, cost and energy of each meal looks promising (let’s just see what they taste of).

I plan to do another couple of nights hammock camping elsewhere so have other items in the car as I want to spend a night or so hammock camping.

Camera Gear

Most of all of my photos and video are taken with an iPhone 6 and a GoPro.  You are limited to what you can take with these devices so I have purchased a new app called slow shutter so hopefully I can take some low light shots.

I still find it very difficult not to take certain items in the back of my mind there’s a little voice “what if you need this?”  What you take if you where Packing for four days in the Lake District ?

Here is the post on the adventure.

Please follow and like us:

Lightweight multi use hammock and tarp tents

Lightweight multi use hammock and tarp tents.  I like the idea of having a choice of whether to hang between the trees or ground dwelling when there are no trees or weather and environment puts you on the ground.

Lightweight multi use hammock and tarp tentsYou have the ability to adapt and also being lightweight you are not carrying items that you won’t need.

 

Kit required

To be able to deal with these scenarios my kit is as follows.

  • 3 X 2.8 DD Hammocks super light tarp (460g)
  • DD Hammocks Frontline hammock (620g)
  • 3 season down sleeping bag (800g)
  • Tyvek sheet cut to size of sleeping mat
  • Exped down lite sleep mat (620g)
  • DD Hammocks Poncho (370g)

Total of 2.87 kg

Lightweight multi use hammock and tarp tents

This then gives the ability to hang or ground dwell. In the hammock setup you won’t feel the cold on your back as the sleep mat will be used in the hammock with the sleeping bag.

In the ground setup with your can setup a a-frame tarp using a ridge line if you have anything to tie too or you can use your walking poles and guy lines.

Hex peak setup

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Another option for Lightweight multi use hammock and tarp tents is the hex peak setup but this leaves the tarp open on the front but utilising the poncho as a door you can overcome water egress.  In this setup there is plenty of space in side to keep out of dripping rain but it is vitally important to setup with the rear of the shelter facing the wind.

Fully enclosed setup

There is an option for a fully enclosed tarp tent, this will stop any water egress apart from running water underneath but down fall is it will heavily condensate up due to no air flow.

So using this setup you have the ability of both hammocking and ground camping. If you had the DD jungle hammock you could lose the poncho as the base of this hammock is waterproof but I like the idea of having the poncho if the heavens open whilst walking, using it as a temporary shelter whilst stopping for lunch etc or using it as a door with the hex peak setup.

This setup with the rest of your lightweight kit shouldn’t bring your weight over 10% of your body weight.

 

 

Tarps and Hammocks By DD Hammocks

Please follow and like us: